The Angelus

The Angelus is a prayer of devotion to the Blessed Mother commemorating the announcement of the Incarnation of Jesus Christ. The name “Angelus” comes from the opening words in Latin: Angelus Domini nuntiavit Mariæ (“The Angel of the Lord declared unto Mary”) and refers to the Angel Gabriel, the messenger of God who revealed to Mary that she would conceive a child named Jesus who would be called the Son of God. (Lk 1:26-35).  The Angelus is prayed by reciting three verses from Luke’s Gospel, and alternating with the “Hail Mary.” In a Catholic tradition dating to at least to the 14th century, the Angelus is prayed in churches, convents, and monasteries three times daily - 6:00 a.m., noon, and 6:00 p.m. - and is usually accompanied by the ringing of the Angelus bell.As stated in the … [Read more...]

Symbols of the Eucharist (5 of 5)

The Chalice with the Host is one of the most recognized symbols of the Eucharist because it portrays an image that is very familiar to those who attend Mass. By showing the Host above the Chalice, we are reminded of the moment at Mass when the priest elevates the Chalice and Host and proclaims the words of St. John the Baptist: “Behold the Lamb of God, behold Him who takes away the sins of the world.” It is interesting that this symbol does not visibly portray the priest, who is called at this moment to echo other words of St. John the Baptist: “I must decrease, and He must increase.” At this moment of the Mass, the attention is focused on Jesus, really and truly present in the Sacred Species of bread and wine. … [Read more...]

Knocking on Heaven’s Door – St. Francis of Assisi

St. Francis of Assisi will host, “Knocking on Heaven’s Door” on Saturday, August 4, 2018, at 9:30 AM in the Lycee Francais Cafeteria, 5951 Patton St., New Orleans. Free parking is available in the lot behind the building. Speaker topics include: End of Life Decision Making - Sister Marie Noel of Notre Dame Hospice; Powers of Attorney & Estate Planning - Gregory S. LaCour of Blue Williams, LLP; and Charitable Giving Considerations - Josephine Everly of The Catholic Foundation. Informational Booths by Catholic Cemeteries, Christopher Homes, St. Francis of Assisi Respect Life Committee, and SFA Senior Associates. Snacks and refreshments provided by SFA Senior Associates. Free and Open to the Public. For more information call 504-227-3766 or familylife@stfrancisuptown.com. … [Read more...]

One Flesh

The desire to love and be loved is the deepest need of our being.  We long to be known, accepted, and cherished by another. Yet, the ability to fully give or receive this love is unattainable on our own. As Catholics we believe Jesus Christ has entered our broken world to conquer sin and restore us to new life. Throughout every age he continues to invite all women and men to follow him through his Church, to whom he has entrusted his teaching authority, so that all can know and follow him.Only God can give us the unconditional love and acceptance that we desire. Yet, he has created marriage, a holy union, to mirror this supreme love on earth. At the heart of their married love is the total gift of self that husband and wife freely offer to each other. Because of their sexual … [Read more...]

Feast of St. Ignatius Loyola – July 31

Ignacio López de Loyola was born in Spain in 1491, the youngest of 13 children. In 1506, he adopted the last name "de Loyola" in reference of the Basque city of Loyola where he was born.  In 1509, Ignatius took up arms under the Duke of Nájera and participated in many battles without injury to himself.  However, on May 20, 1521, in a battle against the French, a cannonball wounded both of his legs.  During his recuperation at Loyola, Ignatius read the Life of Christ by Ludolph of Saxony, a commentary on the Gospels with extracts from the works of over sixty of the Fathers of the Church; the book influenced his whole life.  Ludolph proposes that the reader place himself at the scene of a Gospel story and visualize the scene in a simple contemplation. During his recuperation at Loyola, … [Read more...]

Kateri Tekakwitha

July 14, 2018 First Native American Saint On Sunday, October 21, 2012 the Holy Father, Pope Benedict XVI canonized the first Native American Saint, Kateri Tekakwitha. St. Kateri was born in 1656 near Auriesville, New York, the daughter of a Mohawk warrior and a Christian mother.   At the age of four, smallpox attacked Tekakwitha's village, taking the lives of her parents and baby brother, and leaving Tekakwitha an orphan. She was adopted by her two aunts and an uncle, and although forever weakened, scarred, and partially blind, Tekakwitha survived. The brightness of the sun blinded her and she would feel her way around as she walked.When Tekakwitha was eighteen, Father de Lamberville, a Jesuit missionary, came to Caughnawaga and established a chapel.  Her uncle disliked the … [Read more...]

Christmas in July!

The St. Vincent de Paul Society needs your help in assisting those who come for help with high utility bills during the hot summer months. A Christmas Giving Tree has been set up behind the pews on the school side of the church. There is no need to buy a present and wrap it; all you have to do is pick an ornament with the name of a gift, and place it in an envelope with the requested donation. The Society of St. Vincent de Paul will do the rest. Thank you for assisting us in our apostolate to our neighborhood poor! … [Read more...]

How Should I Dress for Mass?

by Archbishop Gregory M. AymondSummer is here, which in New Orleans usually means dressing down even more casually than we do at other times of year. I know the issue of church attire is a sensitive one – especially in an area where it's hot nine months out of the year.What's your perspective on how people should dress for Mass? I have a variety of feelings about this. There’s a part of me that remains grateful to God that a person is in church, regardless of how he or she is dressed. I certainly realize there are individual circumstances where a person may have other responsibilities and is not able to dress in what we might consider an appropriate manner, so I want to be sensitive to that. At the same time, the church is a sacred place – truly holy ground. It is a consecrated … [Read more...]

Prayer for Religious Liberty

Almighty God, Father of all nations, for freedom you have set us free in Christ Jesus (Gal 5:1). We praise and bless you for the gift of religious liberty, the foundation of human rights, justice and the common good.  Grant to our leaders the wisdom to protect and promote our liberties. By your grace may we have the courage to defend them, for ourselves and for all those who live in this blessed land. We ask this through the intercession of Mary Immaculate, our patroness, and in the name of your Son, our Lord Jesus Christ, in the unity of the Holy Spirit, with whom you live and reign, one God, for ever and ever. Amen.St. Thomas More, pray for us St. John Fisher, pray for us St. Teresa Benedicta of the Cross, pray for us Bl. Miguel Pro, pray for us … [Read more...]

Trinity Sunday

Trinity Sunday, also known as the Solemnity of the Most Holy Trinity, is celebrated a week after Pentecost Sunday in honor of the most fundamental of Christian beliefs—belief in the Holy Trinity. We can never fully understand the mystery of the Trinity, but we can sum it up in the following formula: God is three Persons in one Nature. The three Persons of God—Father, Son, and Holy Spirit—are all equally God. They cannot be divided.  As the above diagram shows, each person of the Holy Trinity is a separate person, having been identified as such in the Holy Bible, but each are also the One True God.  It’s why we make the sign of the cross in the Name of the Father and the Son and the Holy Spirit, rather than the “names.”  It’s a profound mystery that many other religions reject.  It’s not … [Read more...]