From the Pastor – June 9, 2019

Short Daily PrayersWhen the time for Pentecost was fulfilled, they were all in one place together. And suddenly there came from the sky a noise like a strong driving wind, and it filled the entire house in which they were. Then there appeared to them tongues as of fire,which parted and came to rest on each one of them.

And they were all filled with the Holy Spirit and began to speak in different tongues, as the Spirit enabled them to proclaim. (Acts 2:1-4)

The word “Pentecost” is actually a Greek word meaning “fiftieth.”  What we commemorate on Pentecost is the Descent of the Holy Spirit upon the Apostles, an event that occurred fifty days (including Easter Sunday) after the Resurrection.

Historically and symbolically, Pentecost is related to the Jewish Festival of Weeks, celebrating the day (occurring fifty days after the Exodus) on which God gave the Ten Commandments to Moses on Mount Sinai.  What we have are two events in the Old Testament pointing to two future events in the New Testament.  In the Exodus, the Jewish people were freed from their slavery in Egypt.  In the New Testament, the Resurrection freed all of us from slavery to sin and death.  Fifty days after the Exodus, God gave Moses the Ten Commandments.  Fifty days after the Resurrection, God send his Holy Spirit to give us wisdom and understanding by writing the law on our hearts.

The celebration of Pentecost is often referred to as the Church’s “birthday,” and its celebration goes back to Apostolic times.  St. Irenæus wrote about it in the early 2nd Century, and Tertullian spoke about it as being well established around the year 200 A.D.

In parts of Italy it is customary to scatter red rose leaves from the ceiling of churches to recall the miracle of the fiery tongues.  It is even called Pascha rossa because of the red colors of the vestments used on Pentecost.  In some places in France it is customary to blow trumpets during Mass, to recall the sound of the mighty wind which accompanied the Descent of the Holy Spirit.   We might not have trumpets or rose petals for Mass, but we certainly have the red vestments.  And we call down the Holy Spirit upon us so that the 7 gifts (described on the back of this page) might be ours.  Thank God for the gifts of the Holy Spirit, and Happy Birthday, Church!
masstime.us
(Rev. Msgr.) Christopher H. Nalty
msgr.nalty@gmail.co

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Pro-Life Activities


Every Saturday at 11:00 a.m. we pray the Rosary at the Woman’s Health Care Center on the corner of General Pershing and Magnolia near Oschner Baptist Hospital. This facility is one of at least three abortion centers in the New Orleans area and just outside of our parish boundaries. Please join us!

Novena to the Holy Spirit

Novena to the Holy Spirit for the Seven Gifts
(to be prayed beginning May 24)

The novena in honor of the Holy Spirit is the oldest of all novenas since it was first made at the direction of Our Lord Himself when He sent His apostles back to Jerusalem to await the coming of the Holy Spirit on the first Pentecost. Addressed to the Third Person of the Blessed Trbinity, it is a powerful plea for the light and strength and love so sorely needed y every Christian.

NOVENA PRAYER FOR THE HOLY SPIRIT
O Lord Jesus Christ Who, before ascending into heaven did promise to send the Holy Spirit to finish Your work in the souls of Your Apostles and Disciples, deign to grant the same Holy Spirit to me that He may perfect in my soul, the work of Your grace and Your love. Grant me the Spirit of Wisdom that I may despise the perishable things of this world and aspire only after the things that are eternal, the Spirit of Understanding to enlighten my mind with the light of Your divine truth, the Spirit of Counsel that I may ever choose the surest way of pleasing God and gaining heaven, the Spirit of Fortitude that I may bear my cross with You and that I may overcome with courage all the obstacles that oppose my salvation, the Spirit of Knowledge that I may know God and know myself and grow perfect in the science of the Saints, the Spirit of Piety that I may find the service of God sweet and amiable, and the Spirit of Fear that I may be filled with a loving reverence towards God and may dread in any way to displease Him. Mark me, dear Lord, with the sign of Your true disciples and animate me in all things with Your Spirit. Amen.  (Say 7X Our Father, Hail Mary & Glory Be)

 

Diaconal Ordinations

On Saturday, May 18, 2019, at 10:00 AM at St. Louis Cathedral, we will ordain Sylvester Ugbada Adoga, Luis Carlos Duarte Gonza?lez, Kesiena Dennis Obienu, Luis Carlos Valencia Osorio and John Daniel Yike to the Transitional Diaconate for the Archdiocese of New Orleans. You are cordially invited to attend the ceremony.

Mother’s Day and May Crowning

The beginning of Mother’s Day in the United States is usually attributed to a declaration made in 1873 by Julia Ward Howe in which she asked all woman to come together to work for peace. Julia is best known as the author of the “Battle Hymn of the Republic,” which she wrote in 1862. After the publication of the poem, Julia became more famous, and she began to give public speeches, many of which were against war. Julia had witnessed first-hand some of the worst effects of the Civil War – not only the death and disease that killed and maimed the soldiers, but the widows and orphans who were left behind.

In 1870, Julia Ward Howe took on a new issue and a new cause. She determined that peace was one of the most important causes of the world. She wanted women to come together across national lines, to promote common values and to commit to finding peaceful resolutions to conflicts. Her original idea was to seek formal recognition of a “Mother’s Day for Peace.” Her idea was influenced by Anna Jarvis, a young Appalachian homemaker who in 1858 had attempted to improve sanitation through “Mothers’ Work Days.” She organized women throughout the Civil War to work for better sanitary conditions for both sides, and in 1868 she began work to reconcile Union and Confederate neighbors.

Anna Jarvis’ daughter was also named Anna, and she continued the work of her mother and the work of Julia Howe. Much later, when her mother died, the second Anna Jarvis started her own crusade to found a memorial day for women. The first such Mother’s Day was celebrated in West Virginia in 1907 in the church where the elder Anna Jarvis had taught Sunday School. On that day she passed out 500 white carnations – one for each mother in the congregation. The custom caught on – spreading eventually to 45 states. In 1914 the U.S. Congress passed a Joint Resolution, and President Woodrow Wilson signed it, establishing “Mother’s Day” to emphasize a women’s role in the family (and not as activists in the public arena, as Howe’s Mother’s Day had been). One thing important to note is that the apostrophe in “Mother’s Day” is in between the “r” and the “s,” indicating the original meaning of the day, which is to honor one’s own Mother, rather than Mothers in general. It’s interesting that the Anna Jarvis who succeeded in making Mother’s Day a national holiday never became a mother herself.

Altar of Repose

Mass of the Lord’s Supper

At the Mass of the Lord’s Supper on Holy Thursday (7:00 p.m.) sufficient hosts are consecrated for that Mass and for the next day. These consecrated Hosts remain in a ciborium on the corporal in the center of the altar until the end of Mass, after which they are carried in Solemn Procession to the Altar of Repose, with the priest vested in a Cope and Humeral Veil, and covered with a canopy. The Blessed Sacrament remains in the temporary tabernacle at the Altar of Repose, and the Holy Thursday service concludes with the stripping of all altars except the Altar of Repose.

Holy Thursday is a day of exceptional devotion to the Blessed Sacrament, and the repository is the center of the love, prayers and aspirations of the faithful.  After the Good Friday service, the Blessed Sacrament remains available only as viaticum for the dying and for Communion given on Good Friday at the service called The Veneration of the Cross (Good Friday at 3:00pm). While the Blessed Sacrament remains in this temporary tabernacle at the altar of repose, a lamp or candle is always kept burning.

On Holy Thursday we will celebrate the Mass of the Lord’s Supper at 7:00 p.m., which commemorates the institution of the Holy Eucharist when Jesus washed his Apostle’s feet.  This Mass begins the Sacred Triduum.  This year Adoration at this Altar of Repose will take place all night, from the end of the Holy Thursday Mass until the sun rises on Good Friday at 6:00 a.m.

PLEASE SIGN-UP to take an hour or a half-hour of the Vigil!  Sign-up sheets are in the back of church.

Stations of the Cross

During Lent there will be Stations of the Cross and Confession on Fridays at St. Henry Church.  Confession begins at 5:30pm and the Stations at 6:00pm.  Remember that Msgr. Nalty is also in the Confessional from 3:00-3:45pm on Saturdays and 9:15-10:15 a.m. on Sundays.

Eucharistic Miracles of the World

Sunday, June 23, 2019 is the Solemnity of the Most Holy Body and Blood of Christ (Corpus Christi).   On that weekend, our parish will have the Vatican International Exhibit of Eucharistic Miracles on display.  Did you know that there have been hundreds of documented cases where the bread and wine consecrated at Mass actually turned into visible flesh and blood?  The exhibit showcases dozens of these cases with photos and descriptions.


Catalogue of the Vatican International Exhibition

With an extensive assortment of photographs and historical descriptions, the exhibition presents some of the principal Eucharistic Miracles that have taken place over the centuries and throughout the world. Most Eucharistic miracles involve incidences in which the Host has “turned into human flesh and blood.” Certainly, the Church teaches (and we believe) that the consecrated Host is the Body, Blood, Soul, and Divinity of Jesus Christ under the appearances of bread and wine. Through Eucharistic miracles, Christ manifests His Presence in a more tangible and visible way. Interestingly, many Eucharistic miracles have occurred during times of weakened Faith. For example, a number of Eucharist miracles have taken place as a result of someone, often the priest himself, doubting the Real Presence of Christ in the Eucharist. Included in the exhibit are descriptions of many of the most famous miracles, including those of Lanciano, Orvieto and Siena. Each of them has received full approval by the Church. By means of the exhibit, one can “virtually visit” the places where the miracles occurred.

It is important for us to remember that while Eucharistic Miracles can help us more fully understand and live our faith (with Christ the Eucharist as its source and summit), these Miracles are only useful as long as they are closely focused on Jesus Christ. They cannot become autonomous. Miracles can strengthen the faith of believers and even non-believers, but they are valuable only if they direct us to the Eucharist instituted by Christ and present at each celebration of the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass. They must serve the faith. They must not and cannot add anything to the one and only, definitive gift of Christ in the Blessed Sacrament. They are a humble reminder of the Real Presence and can impart a more fruitful and deeper knowledge of it. Join us and see the different ways that Christ has manifested His Real Presence to increase our faith!

THANK YOU, Brother Knights!

From the Knights of Columbus:

On behalf of the Knights of Columbus Council, I want to thank Msgr. Nalty for allowing the Knights to conduct the Lenten Fish Fry at The Mother Pauline Center. Thanks to all the parishioners that came to the fish fry in support of our fund raising event. And to the volunteers who gave of their time and talents to prepare, cook and clean up for these meals: A HEARTY THANK YOU!

We are truly blessed by the number of people who come forward to make these events the success that they are.  Of the monies raised one-half will go to The K.C. Youth Expansion Program (YEP). The second half goes to Good Shepherd Parish. A check for $1,338.47 was presented to Msgr. Nalty following the 8:00 AM mass on Sunday May 19.  

Good Church Etiquette

An instructive reminder

Remember to keep your Eucharistic fast by abstaining from food and beverages (water excluded) for an hour before Mass.

Always dress modestly and appropriately. Arrive early to allow for personal prayer and/or read the readings of the day.

Turn off all mobile devices while still in the vestibule. This is your time with God and His people.

Use the restroom before or after Mass. Men remove hats or caps before the Lord.

Deposit all water bottles in the waste receptacles.

Make the sign of the cross with Holy Water upon entering.

Genuflect with great reverence towards the Blessed Sacrament in the tabernacle before entering your pew. If unable to genuflect, a profound bow is respectful.

Refrain from chit-chat which distracts others who are connecting with God through prayer before Mass.

Join the singing. St. Anselm said that “singing is praying twice.”  Singing with others gives great praise to God, which is really why we are gathered here.

Listen to the readings. God is speaking directly to you.

Receive Communion with laser-like attention. We receive Communion, we do not take it. If choosing to receive the Body of Christ in the hand, place the hand you write with under the hand you will receive, in a way, creating a throne for the Lord. A simple bow of the head to the Eucharist is appropriate as a sign of reverence to Christ before receiving.

Don’t forget to make a prayer of thanksgiving after receiving Communion. “There is no prayer more agreeable to God, or more profitable to the soul than that which is made during the thanksgiving after Communion.” (St. Alfonsus Liguori)

Remember that the point of being at Mass is not to see what we can get out of it, but what you can do to praise and worship the Almighty.

And finally, leave church only after the procession has left the altar. Only one person left the Last Supper early”

Congratulations to Maria Brady and Kate Mascari!

Archbishop Aymond will present the Order of St. Louis IX Medallion to our parishioners Maria Brady and Kate Mascari on Sunday, May 19, 2019, at 3:00 p.m. in St. Joseph Church.  The Order of St. Louis IX award was established more than 40 years ago to honor those members of the laity who have contributed their time and talents to the church.

Even if you don’t know Marie and Kate, you surely know of their work!  They are two of our most diligent rectory volunteers.  Both of them help us with the collection counting.  Kate is also involved with the Society of St Vincent de Paul, and Maria helps with our sacramental registers.  “Whatsoever you do for the least of my brothers, you do for me.” (Mt 25:40).

Mother’s Day and May Crowning

The beginning of Mother’s Day in the United States is usually attributed to a declaration made in 1873 by Julia Ward Howe in which she asked all woman to come together to work for peace. Julia is best known as the author of the “Battle Hymn of the Republic,” which she wrote in 1862. After the publication of the poem, Julia became more famous, and she began to give public speeches, many of which were against war. Julia had witnessed first-hand some of the worst effects of the Civil War – not only the death and disease that killed and maimed the soldiers, but the widows and orphans who were left behind.

In 1870, Julia Ward Howe took on a new issue and a new cause. She determined that peace was one of the most important causes of the world. She wanted women to come together across national lines, to promote common values and to commit to finding peaceful resolutions to conflicts. Her original idea was to seek formal recognition of a “Mother’s Day for Peace.” Her idea was influenced by Anna Jarvis, a young Appalachian homemaker who in 1858 had attempted to improve sanitation through “Mothers’ Work Days.” She organized women throughout the Civil War to work for better sanitary conditions for both sides, and in 1868 she began work to reconcile Union and Confederate neighbors.

Anna Jarvis’ daughter was also named Anna, and she continued the work of her mother and the work of Julia Howe. Much later, when her mother died, the second Anna Jarvis started her own crusade to found a memorial day for women. The first such Mother’s Day was celebrated in West Virginia in 1907 in the church where the elder Anna Jarvis had taught Sunday School. On that day she passed out 500 white carnations – one for each mother in the congregation. The custom caught on – spreading eventually to 45 states. In 1914 the U.S. Congress passed a Joint Resolution, and President Woodrow Wilson signed it, establishing “Mother’s Day” to emphasize a women’s role in the family (and not as activists in the public arena, as Howe’s Mother’s Day had been). One thing important to note is that the apostrophe in “Mother’s Day” is in between the “r” and the “s,” indicating the original meaning of the day, which is to honor one’s own Mother, rather than Mothers in general. It’s interesting that the Anna Jarvis who succeeded in making Mother’s Day a national holiday never became a mother herself.

Corporal Work of Mercy: Feeding the Hungry

A request from Deacon Richard Eason: “The parish provides a meal service for the homeless at the Rebuild Center on the 1st and 3rd Thursday of each month, and at the Ozanam Inn on the 4th Thursday of each month. This is a great opportunity to serve Our Lord’s neediest people and enjoy fellowship with our parishioners. The next meal service is set for March 3rd. For those interested, the meal is cooked in the kitchen of the rectory of Our Lady of Good Counsel, beginning at noon on the day before. The meal service is provided at the Please contact Dorothy ‘Dottie’ Forly,” at 242-1919.

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